Reintegration

What is reintegration

Reintegration is the process of reuniting a child from an institution back into the care of his or her family. Reintegration happens only when a child is ready and willing to be united with his or her natural parents.

The child’s physical and psychological needs are met only when the home situation is stable. Where necessary, we need to support families so they are able to give their children the love and care they need. If a child cannot be reintegrated with his or her natural parents or extended family the child can be adopted or fostered.

In the reintegration process every child’s reintegration story is different.

Why is reintegration necessary

Every child deserves a family.  The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child says the best place for a child with regards his or her psychological development is with his or her family or community of origin. Evidence gathered over 60 years of research tells us that children and babies in institutional care suffer psychological damage and poor physical development. OrphanCare is committed to improving the physical and psychological well-being of children in institutions and those under threat.

OrphanCare proposes reintegrating children as follows:

  • Reintegrating with their birth parents
  • With extended family members or relatives
  • Through legal adoption
  • Temporary fostering until adoptive parents are found
  • Placing special needs children in small group homes

A reintegration case study

Working together to save a family
P is a 52 year old single mother with 3 children. Her husband was physically abusive and a drug user so they separated. P then sent 2 children to HOME in 2006 and the eldest to live with an aunt in a nearby village. OrphanCare worked to reunite them.